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Romans 1:27 - Abandoned Bookmark

Romans 1:27

"and in the same way also the men abandoned the natural function of the woman and burned in their desire toward one another, men with men committing indecent acts and receiving in their own persons the due penalty of their error." (NASB)

"And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly, and receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet." (KJV)

"And the men, instead of having normal sexual relations with women, burned with lust for each other. Men did shameful things with other men, and as a result of this sin, they suffered within themselves the penalty they deserved." (NLT)

Without the light of God's holiness to guide us there is no end to the depth of our fall, the final deception becoming self-deception wherein that which is reprehensible becomes the worldwide norm. The second of three times the key repeated phrase appears (v.26) "God gave them up." God abandons the sinner to the sin and its full recompense.  Can you imagine an eternity in this state?  How amazing is the Grace that came to save me from the eternal abyss!  If we had also eaten from the tree of life would not our fate have been sealed in time?  I believe we were not meant to experience time as we now know it.  We were destined to know time as God knows it with only an eternal present.  How wonderful is the love that stoops to save us from this time.

REC'OMPENSE, n.

1. An equivalent returned for any thing given, done or suffered; compensation; reward; amends; as a recompense for services, for damages, for loss, &c.

2. Requital; return of evil or suffering or other equivalent; as a punishment.

To me belongeth vengeance and recompense. Deu 32.

And every transgression and disobedience received a just recompense of reward. Heb 2.

Burned (εξεκαυ?θησαν)
The terms are terrible in their intensity. Lit., burned out. The preposition indicates the rage of the lust.
Lust (ορε?ξει)
Only here in the New Testament. It is a reaching out after something with the purpose of appropriating it. In later classical Greek it is the most general term for every kind of desire, as the appetite for food. The peculiar expressiveness of the word here is sufficiently evident from the context.
That which is unseemly (τη?ν ασχημοσυ?νην)
Primarily, want of form, disfigurement. Plato contrasts it with ευσχημοσυ?νη gracefulness (“Symposium,” 196).
Which was meet (εδει)
Rev., was due, which is better, though the word expresses a necessity in the nature of the case - that which must needs be as the consequence of violating the divine law.
The prevalence of this horrible vice is abundantly illustrated in the classics. See Aristophanes, “Lysistrata,” 110; Plato, “Symposium,” 191; Lucian, “Amores,” 18; “Dialogi Meretricii,” v., 2; Juvenal, vi., 311; Martial, i., 91; vii., 67. See also Becker's “Charicles;” Forsyth's “Life of Cicero,” pp. 289, 336; and Dollinger's “Heathen and Jew,” ii., 273 sqq. Dollinger remarks that in the whole of the literature of the ante-Christian period, hardly a writer has decisively condemned it. In the Doric states, Crete and Sparta, the practice was favored as a means of education, and was acknowledged by law. Even Socrates could not forbear feeling like a Greek on this point (see Plato's “Charmides”). In Rome, in the earlier centuries of the republic, it was of rare occurrence; but at the close of the sixth century it had become general. Even the best of the emperors, Antoninus and Trajan, were guilty.
On the Apostle's description Bengel remarks that “in stigmatizing we must often call a spade a spade. The unchaste usually demand from others an absurd modesty.” Yet Paul's reserve is in strong contrast with the freedom of pagan writers (see Eph_5:12). Meyer notes that Paul delineates the female dishonor in less concrete traits than the male. Marvin R. Vincent, D.D.

"It is shameful even to talk about the things that ungodly people do in secret." Eph 5:12 NLT

Romans 1:27

"and in the same way also the men abandoned the natural function of the woman and burned in their desire toward one another, men with men committing indecent acts and receiving in their own persons the due penalty of their error." (NASB)

"And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly, and receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet." (KJV)

"And the men, instead of having normal sexual relations with women, burned with lust for each other. Men did shameful things with other men, and as a result of this sin, they suffered within themselves the penalty they deserved." (NLT)

Without the light of God's holiness to guide us there is no end to the depth of our fall, the final deception becoming self-deception wherein that which is reprehensible becomes the worldwide norm. The second of three times the key repeated phrase appears (v.26) "God gave them up." God abandons the sinner to the sin and its full recompense.  Can you imagine an eternity in this state?  How amazing is the Grace that came to save me from the eternal abyss!  If we had also eaten from the tree of life would not our fate have been sealed in time?  I believe we were not meant to experience time as we now know it.  We were destined to know time as God knows it with only an eternal present.  How wonderful is the love that stoops to save us from this time.

REC'OMPENSE, n.

1. An equivalent returned for any thing given, done or suffered; compensation; reward; amends; as a recompense for services, for damages, for loss, &c.

2. Requital; return of evil or suffering or other equivalent; as a punishment.

To me belongeth vengeance and recompense. Deu 32.

And every transgression and disobedience received a just recompense of reward. Heb 2.

Burned (εξεκαυ?θησαν)
The terms are terrible in their intensity. Lit., burned out. The preposition indicates the rage of the lust.
Lust (ορε?ξει)
Only here in the New Testament. It is a reaching out after something with the purpose of appropriating it. In later classical Greek it is the most general term for every kind of desire, as the appetite for food. The peculiar expressiveness of the word here is sufficiently evident from the context.
That which is unseemly (τη?ν ασχημοσυ?νην)
Primarily, want of form, disfigurement. Plato contrasts it with ευσχημοσυ?νη gracefulness (“Symposium,” 196).
Which was meet (εδει)
Rev., was due, which is better, though the word expresses a necessity in the nature of the case - that which must needs be as the consequence of violating the divine law.
The prevalence of this horrible vice is abundantly illustrated in the classics. See Aristophanes, “Lysistrata,” 110; Plato, “Symposium,” 191; Lucian, “Amores,” 18; “Dialogi Meretricii,” v., 2; Juvenal, vi., 311; Martial, i., 91; vii., 67. See also Becker's “Charicles;” Forsyth's “Life of Cicero,” pp. 289, 336; and Dollinger's “Heathen and Jew,” ii., 273 sqq. Dollinger remarks that in the whole of the literature of the ante-Christian period, hardly a writer has decisively condemned it. In the Doric states, Crete and Sparta, the practice was favored as a means of education, and was acknowledged by law. Even Socrates could not forbear feeling like a Greek on this point (see Plato's “Charmides”). In Rome, in the earlier centuries of the republic, it was of rare occurrence; but at the close of the sixth century it had become general. Even the best of the emperors, Antoninus and Trajan, were guilty.
On the Apostle's description Bengel remarks that “in stigmatizing we must often call a spade a spade. The unchaste usually demand from others an absurd modesty.” Yet Paul's reserve is in strong contrast with the freedom of pagan writers (see Eph_5:12). Meyer notes that Paul delineates the female dishonor in less concrete traits than the male. Marvin R. Vincent, D.D.

"It is shameful even to talk about the things that ungodly people do in secret." Eph 5:12 NLT



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