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The Christian Risen With Christ in Newness of Life

The Christian Risen With Christ in Newness of Life

By Charles Simeon

Rom. 6:8–11. Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him: knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him. For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God. Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.

The Gospel in every age, when freely and faithfully delivered, has been calumniated as injurious to morality.  But St. Paul, though he well knew how his doctrines would be misrepresented, did not on that account mutilate the Gospel, or declare it less freely than it had been revealed to him: he proclaimed salvation altogether by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, without any works or deservings on our part: but at the same time he showed that good works, though excluded from any share in justifying the soul, would of necessity be practiced by every believer; because the believer, by his very profession, was, and could not but be, “dead unto sin, and alive unto righteousness.”  He showed, that there would of necessity be in the believer’s soul a conformity to his Lord and Savior, since he bound himself to it in his baptismal engagements, or rather professed to have the actual experience of it before he was baptized; so that he must be a hypocrite, and no true believer, if he was not holy both in heart and life.  To this effect he speaks in the whole of the preceding context; (ver. 1-7)—and in the words which we have just read, he confirms the idea, and founds upon it an animated exhortation.

To elucidate this difficult, but important subject, we shall consider,

I. The truth he assumes—

In close connexion with this is,

II. The persuasion he intimates—

“We believe,” says he, “that we shall also live with him.”

This persuasion is founded on a firm and solid basis—

From hence is deduced,

III. The duty he inculcates—

In this subject we may see,

1. The proper tendency of the Gospel—

2. The true criterion whereby to judge of our faith in Christ—

[We will not disparage other parts of Christian experience; but the only safe test whereby to try ourselves, is, the degree in which we are dead to sin, and alive to God—“The tree must be known by its fruits”—]

3. The connection between our duty and our happiness—

About the author:  Charles Simeon, (Sept. 24, 1759-Nov. 13, 1836), Anglican clergyman and biblical commentator who led the Evangelical movement.  Simeon was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, where he became vice provost (1790–92).  In 1782 he was presented to the living of Trinity Church, Cambridge, where he remained until his death. Renowned as a preacher, Simeon helped found the Church Missionary Society (1797).

 

By Grace Ye Are Saved

By Grace Ye Are Saved by Charles Haddon Spurgeon

It is by the grace of God that ungodly men are preserved from instant death.  The sharp axe of justice would soon fell the barren tree if the interceding voice of Jesus did not cry, “Spare him yet a little.”  Many sinners, when converted to God, have gratefully acknowledged that it was of the Lord’s mercy that they were not consumed.  John Bunyan had three memorable escapes before his conversion, and mentions them in his “Grace Abounding” as illustrious instances of long-suffering mercy.  Occasionally such deliverances are made the means of affecting the heart with tender emotions of love to God, and grief for having offended him.  Should it not be so? Ought we not to account that the longsuffering of God is salvation? (2 Peter 3:15.)  An officer during a battle was struck by a nearly spent ball near his waistcoat pocket, but he remained uninjured, for a piece of silver stopped the progress of the deadly missile.  The coin was marked at the words Dei Gratia (by the grace of God).  This providential circumstance deeply impressed his mind, and led him to read a tract which a godly sister had given him when leaving home.  God blessed the reading of the tract, and he became, through the rich grace of God, a believer in the Lord Jesus.

Reader, are you unsaved?  Have you experienced any noteworthy deliverances?  Then adore and admire the free grace of God, and pray that it may lead you to repentance!  Are you enquiring for the way of life?  Remember the words Dei Gratia, and never forget that by grace we are saved.  Grace always presupposes unworthiness in its object.  The province of grace ceases where merit begins:  what a cheering word is this to those of you who have no worth, no merit, no goodness whatever!  Crimes are forgiven, and follies are cured by our Redeemer out of mere free favor.  The word grace has the same meaning as our common term gratis:  Wickliffe’s prayer was, “Lord save me gratis.”  No works can purchase or procure salvation, but the heavenly Father giveth freely, and upbraideth not.

Grace comes to us through faith in Jesus.  Whosoever believeth on Him is not condemned.  O, sinner, may God give thee grace to look to Jesus and live. Look now, for today is the accepted time!


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